We Have to Measure Where We Were

We Have to Measure Where We Were

“We have to measure where we were to understand where we currently are. If all you are doing is looking forward, you will never understand your progress and will always be chasing goals. For example, if you got tapped 10 times last week but were tapped only 5 times this week, there is improvement. If your guard got passed from the side body 10 times last week but were passed only 9 times this week there is progress. You are learning; even if you don’t feel like you are or don‘t see it. Everyone learns at a difference pace and in a different way. In general, if you train for 5 days, you will retain and build upon it.

Don’t just use side body, sweep, triangle, etc. to measure progress. If I am passing your guard 5 times in a row, and your goal is not to have your guard passed, you can become discouraged. However, set smaller and achievable goals. Goals that are easily measurable and noticeable will to demonstrate to yourself your improvement. It will be a more fair evaluation of how you are doing. Otherwise you will go crazy and it will become too difficult.

Jiu Jitsu will never get easier; the feeling you are having now…about getting beat up, challenged, and pained. Remember where you came from in order to see how far you have come. Then you will have a better understanding of where you are going as you continue to look forward.” – Professor Tony Passos during class 10/9/15

     

 

NAGA Grappling Championship

NAGA Grappling Championship

This weekend we competed at the NAGA Grappling Championship in PA. We couldn’t be more happy or proud of our students. It’s inspiring to see the students put into practice what they have been learning and training in class. Competition is a place to test your skills; not just Jiu Jitsu, but mentally, physically, and (most importantly) emotionally.

A note from Professor Tony: “I couldn’t be more happy how each student performed today. They fought very hard and they all exceeded expectations. We will make some adjustments, but overall this competition has been a great reminder that we are going in the right direction.

I would also like to thank the parents that not only supported their kids, they respected both myself and the coaches – allowing us to do our job. I understand how it is not easy for a parent to be quiet on the sidelines at such a challenging moment. It is important that, no matter how young a kid is, that he/she begins to apply and get out of their comfort zone so that as they mature and become an adult they will be able to perform under the pressures that life will bring them down the road.

One of the things that impressed me at the competition was how, when the kids were done with their competition, they asked their parents to stay over 5 hours to watch Coach Josh and their other adult teammates compete. What is impressive is to see that, even in an individaul sport like Jiu Jitsu, that the kids understand the importance of supporting one another and their coaches.

This is just the very beginning of a beautiful journey we have ahead of us!”